Training

My Philosophy

The journey to horsemanship is, in my experience, a journey to find ourselves. In a very real sense, the horse becomes a mirror for our own challenges and growth. If we struggle to gain courage, the horse requires us to provide leadership; if we struggle to learn patience, the horse asks that we take our time; if we struggle to master our own desires and ambitions, the horse requires that we come to the dance with an unwritten slate so that we can reach for each other and dance together to create a vision of beauty.

That is my vision of classical horsemanship…it is not a movement, not a technique. It is most of all an attitude…one that accepts the horse as a partner and allows him to freely express his opinions. Yes, even his opinions of us. Perhaps most especially, his opinions of us.

Renaissance Farm is the expression of a personal passion to learn and an opportunity for those who share the passion to join in the journey to become better partners for our horses and better people to ourselves. Renaissance Farm is a community of individuals who are each reaching out to become better riders and, in the process, to grow in awareness and understanding of ourselves.

Trainers

Training of the horse and rider are available from Ken Jameson, who worked with Karl Mikolka and George Williams at Tempel Farms in Wadsworth, Illinois, as well as Sandi Ridley, long-time student of Erik Herbermann, and Kristen Cole (who worked with Violet Hopkins, as well as Ken Jameson). All three offer instruction to boarders, but instruction or training are not mandatory. We do, however, plan to develop a set of activities, including a quadrille, riding to music and costumed riding that allow the resident horses and riders the opportunity to explore avenues of enjoyment with their horses and to share their passion with family, friends, and the community at large. The facility offers an excellent venue for exhibitions and future on-site events are a part of the growing plan.